The Filipino Way Of Life By Camilo Osias Essay Topics

Author: Osias, Camilo, 1889-
Title: The Filipino way of life: the pluralized philosophy / by Camilo Osias.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2005
Availability: Where applicable, subject to copyright. Other restrictions on distribution may apply. Please go to http://www.lib.umich.edu/library-administration/access-and-use-policy for more information.
Print source: The Filipino way of life: the pluralized philosophy / by Camilo Osias.
Osias, Camilo, 1889-, Philippines. Constitution.
Boston, New York [etc.]: Ginn and company, [c1940]
Subject terms:
Philippines -- Civilization
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/ARS2496.0001.001
HathiTrust Link: For the possibility of additional viewing options such as full book download, go to HathiTrust.




  • Agoncillo, Teodoro A. 1990. History of the Filipino People. 8th ed. Quezon City, Phils.: Garotech.Google Scholar

  • Alidio, Kimberly A. 2001. Between Civilizing Mission and Ethnic Assimilation: Racial Discourse, U.S. Colonial Education, and Filipino Ethnicity, 1901–1946. Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan.Google Scholar

  • Alzona, Encarnacion. 1932. A History of Education in the Philippines, 1565–1930. Manila: University of the Philippines Press.Google Scholar

  • Anderson, Benedict. 1991. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Revised ed. London and New York: Verso.Google Scholar

  • Bananal, Eduardo. 1974. Camilo Osias: Educator and Statesman. Quezon City: Manlapaz.Google Scholar

  • Bazaco, Evergisto. 1939. History of Education in the Philippines, Vol. 1: Spanish Period-1565–1898. Manila: University of Santo Tomas Press.Google Scholar

  • Bhabha, Homi K. 1994. The Location of Culture. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar

  • Black, Plummer. 1905. “The Filipinos.” Western Courier November 15.Google Scholar

  • Bureau of Education. 1901. First Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1954.Google Scholar

  • —. 1902. Second Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1954.Google Scholar

  • —. 1903. Third Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1954.Google Scholar

  • —. 1904. Fourth Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1954.Google Scholar

  • —. 1905. Fifth Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1954.Google Scholar

  • —. 1910. Tenth Annual Report: Department of Public Instruction. Reprint, Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1957.Google Scholar

  • —. 1913. Good Manners and Right Conduct: For Use in Primary Grades. Manila: Bureau of Printing.Google Scholar

  • Cabral, Amilcar. 1994. “National Liberation and Culture.” In Colonial Discourse and Post-Colonial Theory: A Reader. Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman, eds. New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 53–65.Google Scholar

  • Campomanes, Oscar V. 1995. “The New Empire’s Forgetful and Forgotten Citizens: Unrepresentability and Unassimilability in Filipino-American Postcolonialities.” Critical Mass: A Journal of Asian American Cultural Criticism vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 145–200.Google Scholar

  • Carpio, Remigia D. 1934. A Study of the Philippine Pensionado System Abroad (1903–1928). Master’s thesis, University of the Philippines.Google Scholar

  • Chatteijee, Partha. 1993. The Nation and Its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar

  • Choy, Catherine Ceniza. 2003. Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History. Durham: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

  • Constantino, Renato. 1966. The Filipinos in the Philippines and Other Essays. Quezon City: Malaya.Google Scholar

  • Cooper, Frederick and Ann Laura Stoler, eds. 1997. Tensions of Empire: Colonial Cultures in a Bourgeois World. Berkeley and London: University of California Press.Google Scholar

  • Espiritu, Augustu Fauni. 2000. “Expatriate Affirmations”: The Performance of Nationalism and Patronage in Filipino-American Intellectual Life. Ph.D. diss., University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar

  • Fanon, Frantz. 1963. The Wretched of the Earth. Translated by Constance Farrington. New York: Grove.Google Scholar

  • Freer, William Bowen. 1906. The Philippine Experiences of an American Teacher. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar

  • Fujita-Rony, Dorothy. 2003. American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919–1941. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar

  • Gates, John Morgan, 1973. Schoolbooks and Krags: The United States Army in the Philippines, 1898–1902. Westport: Greenwood.Google Scholar

  • Guha, Ranajit. 1982. “On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India.” Subaltern Studies I: Writings on South Asian History and Society, pp. 1–8.Google Scholar

  • Hoganson, Kristin L. 1998. Fighting for American Manhood: How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar

  • Ileto, Reynaldo C. 1979. Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1840–1910. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.Google Scholar

  • Jacobson, Matthew Frye. 2000. Barbarian Virtues: The United States Encounters Foreign Peoples at Home and Abroad, 1876–1917. New York: Hill and Wang.Google Scholar

  • Kaplan, Amy and Donald E. Pease, eds. 1993. Cultures of United States Imperialism. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar

  • Karnow, Stanley. 1989. In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines. New York: Random House.Google Scholar

  • King, C. Richard, ed. 2000. Postcolonial America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar

  • Lanzar, Maria C. 1928. The Anti-Imperialist League. Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan.Google Scholar

  • Lardizabal, Amparo Santamaria. 1991. Pioneer American Teachers and Philippine Education. Quezon City: Phoenix.Google Scholar

  • May, Glenn Anthony. 1980. Social Engineering in the Philippines: The Aims, Execution, and Impact of American Colonial Policy, 1900–1913. Westport: Greenwood.Google Scholar

  • McClintock, Anne. 1995. Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar

  • Miller, Clyde R. 1929. “Columbia University Observes its One Hundred and Seventy-Fifth Anniversary.” Teachers College Record (November), pp. 245–261.Google Scholar

  • Miller, Stuart Creighton. 1982. “Benevolent Assimilation”: The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899–1903. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar

  • Munoz, José Esteban. 1999. Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar

  • Olivar, Celia Bocobo. 1950. The First Pensionados: An Appraisal of their Contribution to the National Welfare. Master’s thesis, University of the Philippines.Google Scholar

  • Osias, Camilo. 1908. “The Aspiration of the Filipinos.” Western Courier May 28.Google Scholar

  • —. 1914. Syllabus on Educational Methods and Practical Suggestions for Teachers. Manila: Fajardo’s Printing.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1917a. Education in the Philippines under the Spanish Regime. Manila: Philippine Education.Google Scholar

  • —.. comp. 1917b. Division of Tayabas Circulars. n.p.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1918. Notes on Supervision. Manila: n.p.Google Scholar

  • Osias, Camilo. 1921. Barrio Life and Barrio Education. New York: World Book.Google Scholar

  • —.. comp. 1925. Philippine School Laws, 1900–1925. Manila: n.p.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1926. Our Education and Dynamic Filipinism: Speeches and Materials. Manila: n.p.Google Scholar

  • Osias, Camilo—.. 1927. The Philippine Readers, Book 1. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1932a. The Philippine Readers, Book 2. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1932b. The Philippine Readers, Book 3. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1932c. The Philippine Readers, Book 4. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1932d. The Philippine Readers, Book 5. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1932e. The Philippine Readers, Book 7. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1940. The Filipino Way of Life: The Pluralized Philosophy. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1954. Life-Centered Education. Quezon City: Bustamante.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1959. The Philippine Readers, Book 6. Revised ed. Boston: Ginn and Co.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1965. Crusade for the Separation of Church and State. Manila: National Senate.Google Scholar

  • —.. 1971. The Story of a Long Career of Varied Tasks. Quezon City: Manlapaz.Google Scholar

  • Osias, Camilo and Mauro Baradi. 1933. The Philippine Charter of Liberty. Baltimore: French-Bray.Google Scholar

  • Osias, Camilo and Avelina Lorenzana. 1931. Evangelical Christianity in the Philippines. Dayton: United Brethren Publishing.Google Scholar

  • Racelis, Mary and Judy Celine Ick. 2001. Bearers of Benevolence: The Thomasites and Public Education in the Philippines. Pasig City: Anvil.Google Scholar

  • Rafael, Vicente L. 2000. White Love and Other Events in Filipino History. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar

  • Rizal, Jose. 1886. Noli Me Tangere. Reprint, translated by Camilo Osias, Manila: Asian Foundation for Cultural Advancement, 1956.Google Scholar

  • Rizal, Jose. 1891. El Filibusterismo. Reprint; translated by Camilo Osias, Manila: Asian Foundation for Cultural Advancement, 1957.Google Scholar

  • Said, Edward W. 1993. Culture and Imperialism. New York: Vintage.Google Scholar

  • Salman, Michael. 2001. The Embarrassment of Slavery: Controversies over Bondage and Nationalism in the American Colonial Philippines. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar

  • San Juan, E. (Epifanio). 2000. After Postcolonialism: Remapping Philippines-United States Confrontations. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.Google Scholar

  • Schirmer, Daniel B. and Stephen Rosskamm Shalom, eds. 1987. The Philippines Reader: A History of Colonialism, Neocolonialism, Dictatorship and Resistance. Boston: South End.Google Scholar

  • Scott, James C. 1985. Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar

  • Singh, Amritjit and Peter Schmidt, eds. 2000. Postcolonial Theory and the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Literature. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.Google Scholar

  • Stanley, Peter W. 1974. A Nation in the Making: The Philippines and the United States, 1899–1921. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

  • Stoler, Ann Laura. 1995. Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault’s History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar

  • —. 2001. “Tense and Tender Ties: The Politics of Comparison in North American History and (Post) Colonial Studies.” Journal of American History vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 829–865.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

  • Storey, Moorfield and Marcial P. Lichauco. 1926. The Conquest of the Philippines by the United States, 1898–1925. 1985 Reprint, Mandaluyong: Cacho Hermanos.Google Scholar

  • Tan, Samuel K. 2002. The Filipino-American War, 1898–1913. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press.Google Scholar

  • United States Embassy. 2001. To Islands Far Away: The Story of the Thomasites and their Journey to the Philippines. Manila: Public Affairs Section.Google Scholar

  • Willis, Henry Parker. 1905. Our Philippine Problem. A Study of American Colonial Policy. New York: H. Holt and Company.Google Scholar

  • Wolfe, Patrick. 1997. “History and Imperialism: A Century of Theory, from Marx to Postcolonialism.” American Historical Review vol. 102, no. 1, pp. 388–420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

  • Young, Robert J. C. 2001. Postcolonialism: An Historical Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar

  • Categories: 1

    0 Replies to “The Filipino Way Of Life By Camilo Osias Essay Topics”

    Leave a comment

    L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *